Blog Entries in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

How is SENSUS Optimized for Painful Diabetic Neuropathy?

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

SENSUS was designed to meet the unique needs of those suffering from neuropathic pain conditions such as painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN).  People with diabetes and PDN often have physiology that responds differently to electrotherapy than that of someone without diabetes. For instance, nerve degeneration and elevated skin resistance to electrical stimulation are typical in those with diabetes. Effective pain relief may therefore require a more powerful device with higher stimulation output. Most conventional TENS devices do not have the capability of delivering the stimulation characteristics that are needed for those with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and therefore may have limited efficacy and utility for treating PDN.
 
SENSUS is a wearable pain relief device designed to provide the user the freedom to be active while they are receiving therapy. Conventional TENS units include multiple individual electrodes connected to lead wires, which may be awkward to place for pain in the lower legs and feet and it would inhibit the user’s mobility. The SENSUS and integrated electrode are placed on the upper calf. The device is slim enough to be worn discreetly under clothing so the user can go about their daily activities while therapy is being provided.
 
Since PDN often disrupts sleep, traditional TENS devices are not an option for night time pain relief because they cannot be used during sleep. SENSUS is the only nerve stimulator approved by the FDA for use during sleep so it is an option for around the clock pain relief. 
 
Finally, most people with diabetes have complicated treatment programs involving multiple medications and devices such as blood glucose meters. Consequently, many of them will want to avoid an addition to their therapeutic regime that is unnecessarily complicated. Unlike conventional TENS devices, SENSUS is highly automated and can be setup by at home in just a few minutes. Therapy is initiated and stopped by pressing the sole button on the device and will automatically run throughout the day without any management on the part of the user.
 
The SENSUS Pain Management System has been optimized for people with diabetes, and includes advanced technology to enhance convenience while maximizing pain relief. Read More

Posted by NeuroMetrix in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Benefits of Exercise for Neuropathic Pain

Monday, September 29th, 2014

Neuropathic pain can set off a vicious cycle for sufferers. Healthcare providers frequently recommend patients engage in more daily activity, including regular exercise, as a treatment for the underlying cause of their chronic pain, such as diabetes. Unfortunately, the pain itself may prevent the patient from being more active. A recent article in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, “Benefits of exercise intervention in reducing neuropathic pain”, outlined the impact of exercise on peripheral neuropathy. While most people are aware of the positive impact that routine exercise can have on diseases such as diabetes, the article’s authors also review studies that show how exercise can preserve and promote function of the peripheral nerves and reduce the neuropathic pain sensations.  
 
SENSUS may be a good solution for people experiencing chronic pain who would like to be able to incorporate more activity into their daily lives. The device is a convenient, wearable electrical nerve stimulator that offers patients a fast-acting, non-narcotic chronic pain relief option. SENSUS has no side effects, such as lethargy, that may deter a user from exercise. Users may put the device on their leg under clothing and go about their daily activities, including the pursuit of fitness goals. Read More

Posted by NeuroMetrix in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

The Underdiagnosis and Undertreatment of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

A study recently published in the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24257634) assessed the prevalence of painful diabetic peripheral (PDN) and its impact on quality of life and patient satisfaction with their treatment.  The cross section study evaluated 71 subjects with Type 1 or type 2 diabetes (age 45 – 85 years).  Although 22% of the subjects reported a diagnosis of PDN from their physician, 54% reported symptoms of burning, aching, or tenderness in their hands, arms, legs, or feet.  Only 14% of these patients were receiving treatment for their symptoms.  Among subjects reporting symptoms of PDN, over half reported some level of interference with their sleep and a similar percentage stated dissatisfaction with their current treatment. The authors conclude that PDN may be substantially underdiagnosed and undertreated; which represents a potential opportunity for pharmacists to help patients with diabetes achieve a better quality of life. Read More

Posted by NeuroMetrix in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Central Nervous System Involvement with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Monday, April 21st, 2014

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) causes chronic pain (painful diabetic neuropathy) and sensory loss that increases the risk of foot ulcers.  DPN has traditionally been viewed as a disease of the peripheral nerves.  However, several recent studies hinted at additional involvement of the central nervous system (CNS).  Now a novel study using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) by Dinesh Selvarajah and colleagues published in Diabetes Care (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24658391) demonstrates that patients with DPN have structural changes in the brain.  Specifically, the study found peripheral gray matter volume loss in regions of the brain associated with sensory and pain perception.  These findings may have far reaching implications for treating DPN.  If DPN leads to changes in the CNS, then early detection and prevention are critical to mitigate the risk of permanent and severe symptoms.  On the other hand, the brain has an amazing capacity to compensate for the focal loss of neurons (i.e., gray matter), which is called plasticity.  Pharmacological and neurophysiological techniques that enhance plasticity, which include transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, may therefore represent novel therapeutic approaches. Read More

Posted by NeuroMetrix in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Painful Diabetic Neuropathy Is Typically Worse in the Evening

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

A recent study by Ian Gilron and colleagues (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23370066) showed that neuropathic pain increases throughout the day leading to clinically meaningful morning-evening differences.  These results may help explain why people with painful diabetic neuropathy have difficulty falling asleep.  The authors propose that the normally low levels of endogenous opioids (i.e., the body’s natural pain modulators) in the evening may partially account for the morning-night variation in pain.  Interestingly, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation such as with SENSUS is known to increase endogenous opioid levels and may therefore decrease pain and improve sleep. Read More

Posted by NeuroMetrix in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Painful Diabetic Neuropathy May Increase the Risk of Falling

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

A recent study by Paul Lalli and colleagues (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23218484) demonstrated that people with diabetic neuropathy and neuropathic pain have more variability in their gait.  This population also reported great risk of hospitalizations for fall related injuries and a great fear of falling.  The study authors suggest that patients with painful diabetic neuropathy should be evaluated for risk of falling. Read More

Posted by NeuroMetrix in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Burden of Illness Associated with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

A recent study by Alesia Sadosky and colleagues (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23403729) confirms what many people with painful diabetic neuropathy already know through personal experience.  The study showed that painful diabetic neuropathy is associated with high pain levels, poor sleep, anxiety, depression, and low quality of life.  Moreover health care resource utilization and costs were high in this group and increased with pain severity. Read More

Posted by NeuroMetrix in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy